Newspaper Extracts from England, Scotland, and Wales

Source: The Gale Group’s 19th Century British Newspapers data set (offered at
some universities, the British Library, and occasionally on free trial
at other sites); now available as the BritishNewspaperArchive.co.uk
and The Times (London) Digital Archive (also by Gale Group)

Births, marriages, and deaths are in a separate article.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, October 22, 1803

To be let for 9 years, a very desirable farm with dwelling house and 81
acres of arable, meadow, and pasture ground, in occupation of John
Wandlass as tenant, in the township of Fulwell, County Durham.

The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Friday, May 16, 1806

To Haberdashers, Drapers, Straw Manufacturers and others requiring
extensive Shops and Premises, in a public situation, by Messrs.
Winstanely & Son at Garraway’s on Monday next at 12: A beneficial
for 21 years of an excellent spacious shop near 57 feet in depth with
back warehouse and convenient dwelling house most eligibly situate No.
10 Fore-street near Cripplegate Church, many years successfully
established in the haberdashery line…now in the possession of Mr.
John Wanless, retiring into the country.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, October 11, 1806

Arrived in Newcastle, Coastwise, the Woodman, Wanless, from Southampton

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, August 29, 1807

On Wednesday last, the florists and gardeners of Durham held their annual
meeting at the Royal Tent for the show of carnations and melons…Mr.
Wanless, gardener to M. Russell at Hardwick, Esq. M.P. produced the
best Rock Cantaloupe melon.

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, March 19, 1812

Received from Mr John Wanlass, at Mountwhanie, a description of a melon and cucumber pit, with a model

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, June 18, 1812

Joining the Caledonian Horticultural Society as a corresponding member: Mr John Wanless of Mountwhannie

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, Feb 27, 1819

Mr. John Wanless, builder, of Stock Bridge, will be showing some
premises that are for sale [it doesn’t sound like he owns them] on
Pandon Street

The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Friday, February 22, 1822

Court of the Kings Bench, Feb 21
Mr. J.P. Wanless, clerk in The Courier office, proved the damage done
by the mob on the night in question. The riot was so great as to
require the interposition of Mr Minshull, the Magistrate, who read the
Riot Act. [The riot was in response to the failure of the Bill of Pains
and Penalties against her late Majesty, in the House of Lords. The case
was called Stuart and Another vs Smith and Another, and the defendants
lived in the Hundred of Ossulston; the case was to get compensation for
the damage done.]

The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Tuesday, December 31, 1822

Sailed from Falmouth Dec 28 the Castalia, capt. Wanlace, for London.

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, October 23, 1823

Arrived at Grangemouth, the Isabella, [captain] Wandless, from Inverness, carrying timber.

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, December 4, 1823

Arrived at Grangemouth, the Isabella, [captain] Wanlass, from Berwick, carrying grain.

The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Saturday, Dec 20, 1823

Court of the Kings Bench, Dec 19 – Golding vs. Booty, in which Mr Booty
seduced Mr Golding’s wife…Robert Wanliss, porter at the Four Swans in
Bishopsgate street, carried several letters to Mr. Booty

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, January 10, 1824

To be let, Huntlaw Farm containing 220 acres, now in the occupation of
George Wanlace. [It is unclear from the next part of the ad whether
this farm is in Ponteland or Whalton parish.]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, May 15, 1824

I, Thomas Wanlace of Newbegan near Cambo, Northumberland, will not be
answerable for any debts which my brother George Wanlace or his wife
(late of Birkheads but now of Longhorsley) may contract after 12 May
1824.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Saturday, June 12, 1824

For sale: the manor of West-Witton in the North riding of Yorkshire,
including the valuable estate called Wanlass Park, on the River Gore,
which divides it from Bolton Hall Woods, there being a pleasant
carriage road through them to Leyburn, in the rich and beautiful Vale
of Wensleydale. [more detailed description follows]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, September 4, 1824

Arrived at Sunderland the Neptune, capt. Wandlass, from Inverness, with pit pros.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, December 11, 1824

Arrived at Stockton, coastwise, the Isabella, [captain] Wandless.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, February 5, 1825

Arrived, Sunderland, the Isabella, [captain] Wandless, from Alloa, carrying iron.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, May 14, 1825

North Shields Police – William Wanlass of North Shields, blacksmith,
was committed for trial at the next sessions, for an assault with
intent to commit a rape upon Mrs Jane Parkinson, a respectable married
woman, on the road between Tynemouth and Shields, at midnight on
Saturday last, when she was returning home from attending a person who
had just expired.

The Aberdeen Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Wednesday, May 24, 1826

Misses Wanless From London, milliners and dressmakers, beg to acquaint
the Ladies of Aberdeen and its vicinity, that they make millinery and
dresses after the London and Parisian fashions, which they receive
monthly. An assortment of caps and bonnets of the newest fashions
always on hand. 15 St. Nicholas Street.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, February 24, 1827

To be let: the dwelling house, timber yard, and joiner’s workshop, at
the Stock Bridge, occupied by Mr John Wanless. A respectable tenant
will enjoy considerable employment as a joiner & builder, by the
Proprietor, besides other advantages. Enquire of Mr. Andrew Batie, 6
Forth St, or Messrs Sorsbie & co, Sandhill.

The Times, Monday, Apr 30, 1827; pg. 1

Herefordshire Society – The anniversary of this ancient and laudable
institution will take place on 16 May 1827 at the Freemason’s Tavern,
Great Queen street, Lincolns Inn Fields. Stewards include Mr. T.P.
Wanless

The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Wednesday, October 24, 1827

Cases before the King’s Bench – Special Juries – Sharp vs. Wanlass

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, Oct 6 and Oct 20, 1827

For sale, a lease in South Shields: A dwelling house on North street,
South Shields, a stable, a spacious tenement…and three coach-houses
behind the above dwelling house, now occupied by John Hodgson, James
Young, and Ralph Wanless, as tenants.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, June 14, 1828

Subscribers toward erecting a stone bridge across the High Ford on the
River Wansbeck between Morpeth and Mitford – Messrs Thornton &
Wandlass gave £2 2s.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), September 6, 1828

Game certificate obtained by George Ridley for Richard Lambert, Esq. for Newbrough, Davyshield, Wanless, and Dultrees.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, December 20, 1828

Newcastle Police – On Wednesday last, Richard Wandlass was convicted of
an assault on Mr. Jos. Coates and was sentenced to pay 5s as a fine and
4s as costs, which he paid and was discharged.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, January 10, 1829

Mr. G. Wanlace of Hetchester-law, member of the Belsay Association, to protect the inhabitants agaist theft, burglary, etc.

The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Saturday, December 5, 1829
Court
of the King’s Bench: Wanless (assignee) v. Cawthorne – action on a bill
of exchange for £140 dated 17 Jan 1824. A person named Thomas George
Martin, a stockbroker, had lent the amount in different cheques in the
years 1818 and 1819 to the defendant. Martin became bankrupt through
embezzlement and/or mismanagement of his client’s funds, and his
assignee (Wanless) brought this action. Plaintiff was declared
non-suited.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, July 24, 1830

Thomas Wanlace on list of “principal graziers, cattle dealers, and
others…determined to resist all attempts to induce us to drive our
stock south of Morpeth and to continue to meet our Friends there as
usual”.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, December 4, 1830

To be let, that sound healthy stock farm called Ottercaps, parish of
Elsdon and Corsenside, Northumberland, 16 or 17 miles from Morpeth
Market, now in the occupation of Messrs Thornton and Wanlace,
containing 2,561 acres

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, December 3, 1831

To be let…Wardrew in the parish of Haltwhistle, containing 1055 acres
more or less, now occupied by Mr. English…also the excellent and
commodious mansion house and garden at Wardrew, either with the farm or
separately. Mr. Wanless of Wardrew will send a person to show the farm
and house at Wardrew.

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Saturday, April 21, 1832

Galashiels Academy, taught by Mr Fyshe and his two assistants, Messrs
Murray and Wanless, was this day examined by a committee of the
Presbytery of Selkirk. [Mentioned again on Thursday, May 2, 1833.]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, August 11, 1832

Northumberland
Assizes – Extracts from the testimony in the death of Cuthbert Skipsey
and trial of Anthony Wanless. [Full page available at Wanless Web in
Documents.]
Manslaughter – George Weddell, a special constable, was
indicted for killing and slaying Cuthbert Skipsey, a pitman, near
Chirton on the night of Sunday the 8th of July. Testimony follows.

Mr George Huntley: I am a surgeon at Howdon. I remember being sent
for about 8 o’clock on the night of Sunday July 8th to Dobson’s public
house near Chirton. I examined the body and found a wound in the left
breast occasioned, in my opinion, by shot or slugs. The shot wounds
were the cause of his death. His name was Cuthbert Skipsey. I knew him
before; he was a workman at Percy Main Colliery. The shot had spread;
there were 21 wounds in the breast.

John Heckles: I am master wasteman at Percy Main Colliery…about 8
o’clock I was going from Percy Main to Chirton. I saw a man named
Alexander Clark. He was sitting on his hat on a waggon-way. I saw the
policemen, 5 or 6, go across the rail-road. As they went past, Clark
turned around and said “I’m a pitman, but your are not – you are
blacklegs.”. One of the police turned back and asked what he meant by
insulting them so. Another policeman came back and said “take him, neck
him” and they siezed him by the collar and dragged him off…I
afterward heard the report of a pistol and saw Skipsey cross his arms
and walk some yards. He appeared to be in great agony. I did not see
him fall. I saw one of the policeman in front of him when he clasped
his hands and another policeman was at his left hand.

William Patteson, a lad: I live at Chirton gate. My father keeps the
toll bar…Skipsey laid his hand on the policeman’s shoulder and said
“Let him be, friend, he’s drunk.”. The policeman said “Stand back” and
shoved him off and shot him. Skipsey put his hand to his breast and
fell back on the dyke side. The rest of the police had pistols and
struck the men with them before Weddell fired. The pitmen had no sticks
or other weapons. Before the shot was fired, I heard someone cry “Fire”
– this was before Skipsey laid his hand on Weddell and before he fired.

More testimony from:

Nevison Thompson,age 14, son of Patrick Thompson of Chirton, shoemaker
Josiah Dobinson, a boy
James Wild, a boy
James Arkley, sawyer of Percy Main
W.G. Charlton, a boy
Jane Bryson, niece to Mrs. Dobson of the public house – Skipsey was in the company of Joseph Taylor when he left the pub
Joseph Taylor, pitman of Percy Main Colliery
John Charlton, Richard Cooper, Silas Dawson, and John Jewett, pitman

Michael Robson, Esq., an owner of Burdon Main Colliery – on the 5th of
April a number of our pitmen struck and have since ceased to work at
the pit. Since the beginning of June we have had policemen stationed
about the pit.

T.J. Turnbull, clerk to the magistrates of part of Northumberland; magistrates are Mr Bigge and Mr Brandling

George Waugh, special constable, of Gateshead – we heard the report of
2 pistols. After the 2nd report, which was a signal, we ran up and
found a man lying with his hat and coat off in the road. His name was
Wild. There were some men about him, trying to get him away. He was
struggling and very violent. The next thing I saw was a man of the name
of Wanless in custody of Higgs and Corby. The mob was coming to rescue
him. The mob was 2 dozen persons, mostly pitman. Gilroy & I went to
assist Higgs and Corby and kept the mob off as well as we could. I saw
that Wanless was wounded by a blow on the back of the head. I saw
Skipsey on the hedge side; he was moving when I first saw him. We made
4 prisoners and took them to the guard house. Wanless was cut with the
butt end of a pistol.

Robert Pattison, special constable, of Newcastle – was with George Waugh

Ralph Falcus, chief of constables – I took Matthew Raine with me…the
man sitting on his hat on the railway made an oath and said there
should be a blackleg going to work in the pit that night. His language
was very bad and threatening. I turned around and desired him to go
away. He said we were all blacklegs and we should go home and work. He
would not leave. I and Weddell tried to remove him. He made a loud
noise and threw himself on the ground…about 20 or 30 people came
running from Dobson’s house, from the Percy Main pit. They siezed Clark
and rescued him from our custody. Wild then threw off his coat and
waistcoat, dared me to fight, and struck me over the head…he struck
me again; I thought he was in liquor. I called for assistance. Matthew
Raine was to the left of me lying on the ground. Weddell and another
man dressed in blue were struggling very hard for the pistol…I heard
the pistol go off on my left and then a shot immediately to my right.
Higgs was struggling with Wanless for the pistol; Wanless wanted to get
the pistol from Higgs…the conduct of the pitmen was so violent that I
considered my life in danger. [hissing and yelling from the pitmen in
the court]

Matthew Raine, special constable
John Corby, special constable

William Higgs, special constable – Wanless, a pitman, tried to take a
pistol from Higgs and to prevent that, Higgs struck Wanless on the back
of his head with the butt end of the pistol

Thomas Tate, Thomas Scott, and John Sheldon, grocer of Jarrow, passers-by

John Marley, John Tate, T. Forsyth, G.A. Lambert all vouched for Weddell’s good character and peaceable disposition

The jury was instructed to decide if Weddell was guilty of
manslaughter (i.e. fired intentionally and was not in danger of his
life at the time). The jury deliberated from 1:25 a.m. to 2 a.m. and
returned a guilty verdict but recommended the prisoner to mercy.

Weddell was sentenced on Aug 4th to 6 months in prison doing hard
labour, the judge having believed him to be in fear of his life and
firing on someone else’s command. The sentence was received “with marks
of disapprobation” by the body of the court.

Same page: 4 Aug 1832 – John Wild, Anthony Wanless, Ralph Turnbull,
and William Wilkinson were arraigned on the charge of assaulting Ralph
Falcus, Matthew Raine, and William Higgs, policemen in the execution of
their duty. Mr Cresswell for the prosecution said he would bring no
evidence against Turnbull and Wilkinson and would prefer a charge of
common assault against Wild and Wanless, to which they pleaded guilty.
Sentenced to be imprisoned for 3 months.

Cobbett’s Weekly Political Register (London, England), Saturday, October 13, 1832

List of inhabitants of Tynemouth, North Shields, and vicinity
(Northumberland) offering a congratulatory address to Mr. Cobbett, who
had delivered a lecture to them on 25 Sep:

Anthony Wandless, Alex. Wandless, jun., Alex. Wandless, sen.

The Hull Packet and Humber Mercury (Hull, England), Tuesday, November 6, 1832

To let, a farm at Wanlass in the parish of Cottingham, Yorks, comprising a farm house and about 70 acres of land.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, April 27, 1833

Mr John Wanless, builder, of Stock Bridge, is showing various dwelling houses on Eldon St near Barras Bridge.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, September 28, 1833

William Wanless, solicitor, Bedford Street, Bishopwearmouth, Agent of the Union Life & Fire Office, for Bishopwearmouth.

[Also on Saturday, December 21, 1833, Saturday, June 21, 1834, Saturday, March 21, 1835.]

Perry’s Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette, 1833

Information to creditors – Mark Wanlace, of Northumberland, 5s

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, March 15, 1834

Cleared for foreign ports at Sunderland, the Reform, Wandlass, for Cherbourg.

The Belfast News-Letter (Belfast, Ireland), Tuesday, June 3, 1834

From the Caledonian Mercury: A white Highland pony belonging to Mr.
Wanlace of Skelly near Netherwitton, which is now 27 years old, foaled
her 21st foal on Saturday last.

Perry’s Bankrupt and Insolvent Gazette 1834
Insolvents to meet
at the Durham Courthouse on Nov 15th- Robert Wandlass,
Monkwearmouth-shore, publican, and William Wandless, Easington lane,
coal-miner

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, April 25, 1835

On Thursday week, as George Baker of Gilesgate was passing up Wanless’
lane, Durham, with his master’s cart, the horses took fright, and in
endeavouring to restrain them, he was crushed between a wall and the
cart.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, May 9, 1835

John Wanless helped survey the equestrian theatre structure at Westgate and certified its safety.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, January 2, 1836

Robert Wanless a fireman in Newcastle, attesting that the firemen
responded promptly to the fire at the Bird-in-the-Bush Inn and had the
fire under control before the Sun Fire Office got their engine there.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, September 10, 1836

At the Petty Sessions, held at Bedlington on Saturday last, Christopher
Wanlass, Joseph Jude, William Mordue, John Smart, Henry Robinson, and
Edward Craswell, bound pitmen to the owners of Cramlington Colliery,
were brought before the magirstrates for refusing to go to work and
were discharged from their bonds and employment.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 24, 1837

Cleared for sailing from Stockton, the William Barker, capt. Wanless.

The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Tuesday, March 28, 1837

The Reform, capt. Wanless, has put back to Seaham with considerable damage, after having struck the pier.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 16, 1838

All persons having claims against the estate of the late William
Wanless of Thistleton in Whittingham parish, and all persons indebted
to said estate, should send their accts to Mr Archbold Wanless of
Biddleston or Mr Jas. Brown of Allenton.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, June 1, 1838

Pursuant to a decree of the High Court of Chancery made in the cause of
Wanlace vs Thompson, the creditors of George Burn late of East
Woodburn, Northumberland, yeoman, who died in August 1834, are to prove
their debts before Sir Giffin Wilson, one of the Masters of said court,
at Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane, London, or in default thereof,
they will be excluded the benefit of said decree.

The Northern Star and Leeds General Advertiser (Leeds, England), Saturday, August 25, 1838

On Monday week, a serious fire, supposed to be the work of an
incendiary, broke out in the premises of Mr John Wandless, farmer and
ship-owner, of High Southwick, near Sunderland.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, November 2, 1838

Mr Bernhard Salom, optician of Edinburgh, recommended by Dr John
Wanless, Esq, Surgeon, Dundee, will be giving a lecture in Newcastle.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, April 12, 1839

Mr. William Wanlass appointed a surveyor of highways for Richmond parish for the ensuing year.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, July 5, 1839

Lost from Greenleighton, twelve wedder sheep, marked with T.W….Messrs Wanlace and Thornton, Harwood

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Saturday, July 6, 1839

Thomas Wanlass sworn onto the Grand Jury at the Richmond Sessions.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, November 22, 1839

The brig Thomas Oliver, capt. Wanless, of Sunderland, from Richibucto
for Neath, has arrived at Mumbles, all well, after 36 days passage.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, July 24, 1840

To be sold pursuant to a decree of the High Court of Chancery made in
the cause of Wanlace vs Thompson, with the approbation of Sir Griffin
Wilson, some time in the month of September next, of which due notice
will be given, the freehold estates of East Woodburn and Nether
Rochester, Northumberland, late the property of George Burn deceased,
now occupied by John Rickleton and William Tolfer. [Aug 21 paper said
they would be sold 15 Sept.]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, November 13, 1840

Wanted: apprentice for the grocery business – Thomas Wanless, Wallsend

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Saturday, December 4, 1841

Ad for G. Wanless, #5 Market St, Briggate, Leeds, regarding the
establishment of his truss-making business. He is Surgical Machinist to
the Leeds Infirmary.

The Era (London, England), Sunday, February 6, 1842; Issue 176

Partnerships dissolved: Earle and Wandless, Kingston-upon-Hull, marble masons

The Examiner (London, England), Saturday, January 14, 1843

Partnerships dissolved: J. Humble, L. Wandless, E. Storey, and W.J.
Taylor, Durham, engineers, so far as regards L. Wandless and E. Storey

The Era (London, England), Sunday, January 22, 1843

In a column answering legal questions, reference is made to a case
called Forster vs. Wandless, 7 T R 117, which apparently had something
to do with a landlord’s right to enter collect rent or take over
possessions in place of rent.

The Era (London, England), Sunday, June 18, 1843

Frightful Accident At The Residence of Sir John Rennie – An inquest was
held yesterday by Mr Higgs at the Charing Cross Hospital on the body of
Ellen Wandlass, a fine young woman aged 19 who was killed at the
residence of Sir John Rennie in Scotland-yard under the following
melancholy circulstances. George Burt, groom to the Hon. Sidney
Herbert, Secretary to the Admiralty, said that on Thursday night last,
about half past 9 o’clock, he was at his master’s stables, which faces
those of Sir John Rennie, when he saw the deceased, who was sister to
Sir John’s coachman, come to the loft door over the stable with a small
basin in her hand. She threw some water out of it, and in doing so her
foot slipped or she overbalanced herself and fell out of the loft, her
head coming in contact with the stones in the yard. She was picked up
but was quite dead. The basin which she still held in her hand was
unbroken and the depth she fell was eleven feet. Thomas Fillhook said
the deceased was his wife’s sister and had been staying with him
nineteen weeks out of a situation. On the very day of the accident she
had obtained a situation, which she was to have gone to on Thursday
next. Mr John Moore, House Surgeon, said the deceased was quite dead
when brought into the hospital and from the extensive fracture of the
skull, he should say her death was instantaneous. Verdict was
accidental death.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 15, 1843

Tuesday Dec 12 – William Crammond, who was remanded on Friday, charged
with suspicion of having stolen poultry, was transferred to the
magistrates for the county, the poultry having been stolen out of the
roost of Mr. Joshua Wanlace, farmer, Shelley. [details of the theft
appear at the beginning of this column, Dec 8th – basically, Crammond
was caught carrying the poultry into town in a sack, and the police
were suspicious because he belonged to a family of well-known thieves]

Local
collection, or, Records of remarkable events connected with the Borough
of Gateshead, 1840. Volume 2. Gateshead-on-Tyne, 1841-1845 [Gale Group,
Making of the Modern World]

From the Gateshead Observer, 20 April 1844

Regarding colliers on strike at Kelloe…some men were filling waggons
with coal at the heap and a number of pitmen attacked them by throwing
stones and beating them. Taken into custody were William Wanless,
William Mason, Edward Dickenson, Robert Atkinson, and Thomas Lonsdale,
committed to Durham gaol to be tried at the next sessions for their
part in the disturbance.

The Times, Wednesday, Dec 11, 1844

Wines in bond wanted…apply to W.M. at Mr. Wanless’s, tobacconist, Queen street, Cheapside.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, April 18, 1845

Poor Law Guardians, Castle Ward Union: Robert Wanlace of Gallowhill.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, July 4, 1845

Auction of marble sculptures from the works of Mr Wandlass, Osborne street, Hull.

The Times, Wednesday, Aug 05, 1846; pg. 7

Northern Circuit court, Newcastle – Brown vs. Wanliss – plaintiff seeks
compensation from defendant who had plaintiff charged with sheep
stealing. Plaintiff Brown is a sheep farmer with his father and
brothers at Elsdon. Defendant is a sheep farmer at Biddleston, about 10
miles away. In the month of Dec last, Wanliss alleged he had lost 4
gimmer sheep and came with his brother to Brown’s farm, saying he had
heard they were there. He fetched a constable and Brown and his brother
Thomas were taken in to custody and a gimmer sheep was identified by
Wanliss as being his. The prisoners were removed to Alnwick (15 miles
away) and the complaint was heard the next day and dismissed. It is
contended that Wanliss was acting maliciously in revenge for some past
dispute involving a sheep that had wandered from Brown’s to Wanliss’s
land, but had been restored without complaint by Wanliss. Evidence
showed that the current sheep found belongs to the plaintiff Brown.
John Wanliss and his brother the defendant have a farm at Barrard. The
sheep are marked with ear clippings. Thomas Brown said if it was his
sheep, it would eat turnips, something sheep usually will not do
without training; other witnesses said the sheep only ate turnips after
trying for two days to feed them to it. It was alleged that the ear
marks had been tampered with. The jury decided that the defendant had
not acted maliciously and had reasonable cause to believe his sheep
were on Brown’s farm.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, December 4, 1846

Hull Police Court – Dismissed with payment of a small fine, John King, for using threatening language to George Wandlass.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, January 8, 1847

To be let for 3 years, the mansion house at Wardrew, Haltwhistle, occupied by William Wanless.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, May 28, 1847

Change Ringing – The Newcastle & Gateshead Union Society of Change
Ringers ascended the All Saints tower and rang a complete peal of
Gransire Tripples, consisting of 5,040 changes in 2 hrs and 55 minutes,
performed by tenor (weight 19 cwt) Richard Wanless [among others
listed]. The peal consisted of 194 bobs and 46 singles and is the first
of this composition ever performed here. It was conducted by Thomas Gay
with Thomas Wilson being the umpire and keeper of the time.

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Monday, June 14, 1847

Mr Wanless is in charge of renovating and improving the Glasgow Cathedral.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, July 16, 1847

George Wandless of Hull signed a list of Hull electors recommending Matthew Talbot Baines to Parliament.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 20, 1847

Mr. A. Wanless of Biddleston, Rothbury took a first for best tup of any
age in the Cheviot sheep category at the Wooler Agricultural Show. Also
best pen of 2 Dinmont tups.

and

Voters polled at Morpeth in the latest election included T. Wanless of
Blackpool, M. Wanless of Low Gallowhill, and R. Wanless of Foulmart Law

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, September 3, 1847

North Shields – Richard Wilson, Wanless Johnson, and Robert Scott, 3
boys, were each fined one penny for trespassing on the Heaps near the
Colliery

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, November 12, 1847

Elizabeth Wanless and Mary Doyle were charged with stealing a silver
fork from Revd. J.C. Bruce. Police entered the Sandgate house of Doyle
– a house of the worst description and a receptacle for thieves and
prostitutes – where they found 2 men and the prisoners. One man said
Doyle had been trying to sell a watch and other silver articles, and
police also found a fork and other articles of plate that had been
stolen from his house on 6 July last. They also found in the pocket of
Doyle a valuable gold breast pin belonging to a gentleman who had
recently been robbed. Prisoners were remanded for further inquiry.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 3, 1847

To be sold at auction 8 dwelling houses on Woodbine st,
Bishopwearmouth. Contact Simon Wanless, one of the occupiers, at 22
Woodbine st.

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Friday, January 14, 1848
Mr
Wanless, the overseer of repairs to the Cathedral, caught a blackguard
boy throng at work knocking away, with a stone, the mastic recently
laid upon one of the old carved doors.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 18, 1848
The
Change Ringers of St Nicholas Church visited Durham Cathedral to ring
several harmonious tripples concluding with a quarter peal comprising
1,250 changes in 46 minutes. Included Richard Wanless, tenor. Conducted
by Robert Balmbro. Tenor 36 cwt. It has been upward of half a century
since any change ringing was done on the Cathedral bells. [Richard
mentioned as a change ringer at All Sts on 23 Jun 1848.]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 25, 1848

Wandless Lane in Durham city mentioned.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 3, 1848

Belsay Association for the Prosecution of Felons – members – John Wanlace, Belsay Guide Post

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, April 21 1848

Poor Law Guardians, Castle Ward Union: R. Wanlace of Gallowhill.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, June 2, 1848

Sunderland, Saturday, Michael Hall of Southwick and John Wandlass jun.
of Monkwearmouth were summoned for using a greyhound in search of game,
at Hylton. Not having a certificate, were each fined 20s and costs.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, October 27, 1848

Bankruptcy court re Whitfield Burnett, Luke Wandless, Robert Moon
Watson, Daniel Stoker, and Thomas Harrison, of the Chartershaugh Coal
Company. Wandless and Harrison were both practical men, the former
having been a sinker and the latter a viewer, so they did not enter the
concern without some practical knowledge. Wandless has no private
estate and no creditors. The company owes £1700 through unsuccessful
speculations by Mr Watson.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, November 10, 1848

At Bridlington on 7 Nov, the Beaver, capt. Wanless, from Rouen for Sunderland, parted from both her anchors in the Humber.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, November 24, 1848

Chartershaugh Coal Co bankruptcy details…Luke Wandless had been an
ironmonger in partnership with Humble, who absconded and never
surrendered. Wandless engaged in ships with Burnett but had not been
prosperous. He invested £1100 in the colliery. He had been an
ironmonger, shipowner, coal miner, civil engineer, and farmer. He
claimed a large sum was due to him from Sunderland Water Co but they
denied owing him anything

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 29, 1848

Sunderland – Thomas Strong and John Wandlass were charged with night
poaching at Hylton, on land occupied by Mr Baxter. The case was
adjourned at the request of the defendants in order to produce
witnesses on their behalf.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 9, 1849

Christopher Wanless, Hazelrigg, joined the Killingworth Association for Prosecution of Felons. [repeated on 22 Feb 1850]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 9, 1849

Sunderland Police, Monday – Margery Wandlass, for wilfull damage to a
window, crockery ware, and various articles of household furniture, the
property of Ralph Kirton, was fined £2, and for an assault on Ann
Kirton, the further sum of 10s and costs, or to be committed for 14
days to the house of corrections.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 23, 1849

Re the bankruptcy case of the Chartershaugh Coal Co, Luke Wandless had
paid £171 out of £267 owed, but was now embarrassed by fresh debts
because cheques he had given upon the Sunderland Water Company had been
dishonoured, although the company undoubtedly owed him money.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, April 6, 1849

Durham Easter Sessions – Geo. Wanlass, age 59, charged with having, at
Witton Park on the 12th of March, stolen five pieces of rope, the
property of Henry Stobart. Mr Greenwell stated the case. The prisoner
was seen on the prosecutor’s premises on the day named, and on the
following morning it was found that a quantity of rope had been cut
away from some hay-stacks. On the previous night, a quantity of rope
was found in a lodging-house in Bishop Auckland in which the prisoner
was staying. Three months improvement, hard labour, except last
fortnight solitary.

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, July 2, 1849

Gottenburgh, June 23 – the Gamma, capt. Wanless, of Sunderland, from
Memel to Peterhead, in making for the Wingo Beacon on the 19th inst,
struck the ground off Buschar but was got off with assistance and the
cargo heated.

The Aberdeen Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Wednesday, July 18, 1849

Sailed from Aberdeen, the Beaver, capt. Wanless, for Newcastle

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, August 3, 1849

Hull Police Court – a man named Wanless was involved in a quarrel
between Richard Pape and John Hall and George Nicholson, the landlord
of the Butcher’s Arms.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 10, 1849

At the Waldridge Colliery Flora and Horticulture Society show, Thomas
Wandless took the prize for best 6 kidney potatoes, 2nd prize for best
6 round potatoes

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, September 7, 1849

Arrived at Hamburg, the Beaver, capt. Wanless, from Sunderland.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, November 16, 1849

Sunderland Police – George Newton of Southwick, for wilful damage to a
haystack, property of John Wandlass, was fined 6d and costs.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 1, 1850

South Shields Police – 19 Feb – Jos. Wanless was fined 20s, Jos.
Williamson 40s. and Thomas Young 20s and costs, for assaulting Martin
Powell on the 20th inst and stealing from him a quantity of oranges
from him. They are all pitmen at Jarrow.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 29, 1850

Sale of farming stock at Gallow Hill farm, Bolam parish, belonging to
Mr Mark Wanlace, on May 2, 1850. [Apr 19 paper adds a list of the
stock.]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, June 14, 1850

J. Wanlass on the Lumley cricket team (County Durham).

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, April 19, 1850

Sunderland – Monday – George Wandless, for causing a disturbance in
John Street, Monkwearmouth, was fined 2s 6d and costs, and for
assaulting PC Dennison in the execution of his duty, the further sum of
5s and costs.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, June 21, 1850

Arrived at Cronstadt on June 14, the Gamman, capt. Wanlass.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, November 8, 1850

William Wanlass, painter, re-elected councillor for the borough of Richmond.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, January 10, 1851

For sale, 300 sacks of fine French flour, just arrived on the Beaver, Capt. Wanlas, from Fecamp.

Daily News (London, England), Saturday, January 11, 1851

From Newcastle, Mr Thomas Wanless and others provided implements of husbandry to the Great Exhibition in the Glass Palace.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, Feb 21, 1851

Belsay Association for the Prosecution of Felons – members – John Wanlace, Belsay Guide Post

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, April 18, 1851

To be sold by auction, 5 freehold dwelling houses on Church St and
Blandford Place in Seaham Harbour, adjoining each other. Mr Wanless is
one of the occupiers.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 8, 1851

At the Waldridge Colliery Flora and Horticulture Society show, Thomas
Wandless took 3rd prize for best 6 kidney potatoes, 2nd & 3rd for
best pods of peas, 1st & 2nd for best white turnips.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 15, 1851

Sunderland – Monday – Thomas Wandlass, of Southwick, charged with
ill-treating his wife, was ordered to find sureties for his future good
behaviour.

Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Tuesday, April 20, 1852

Partnerships dissolved – H. Dowson, G. Harker, and L. Wandless, proprietors of Westerton Quarry, Durham

The Times, Friday, Jul 16, 1852; pg. 11
Wanted…a cottage
within a few miles of London…neighbourhood of Blackheath
preferred…letters to F.D. in care of Mr Wanless, Observer office, 170
Strand.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, Aug 27, 1852

Lanchester – William Reed, Edward Reed, William Wanless, James
Wanless, and Michael Baggan, of Craghead, pit boys, for willfully
breaking sheeves on Burnhope colliery railway, were ordered to pay 16s
damages and 6s6d costs.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 26, 1853

T. Wanless of Rainton Bridge on cricket team

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, November 4, 1853

Mr William Wanlass re-elected councillor for the borough of Richmond.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, July 7, 1854

Attack by Pirates on a Shields Vessel – W. Wandless was an apprentice
on the brig Cuthbert Young belonging to James Young, Esq, of South
Shields, Captain John George Marshall. It was taken by pirates on 21
June on the coast of Riff within 10 miles of Cape Tres Forcas, out 25
days from Malta, in ballast. Some of the crew escaped in a skiff and
were picked up 17 hrs later by the Austrian bark Vincenzo. Wandless,
the captain, and the others were in this group and were landed at
Gibraltar on the 16th.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 9, 1855

To be sold at auction, the public house at Hazelrigg called the Grey Horse, occupied by Mr Christopher Wanless.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 10, 1855

Found on the 4th inst a black dog, a cross between a spaniel and a
Newfoundland. The owner may have it by applying to Mr Wanless, Plate
Glass Works, Forth Banks, on paying expenses. If not claimed in 10
days, will be sold.

and

Police Court – Adam Wanless and John Stephenson were charged with
having assaulted Arthur Richardson and robbed him of 3-1/2d. The
parties had been drinking together and the prosecutor had paid for the
ale with a sixpence, receiving 3-1/2d in change. He left the house, the
prisoners followed, and Stephenson put his arm round his neck, stopped
his mouth with his hand, while Wanless took the copper from his pocket.
Committed for one month.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, September 28, 1855

Adam Wanless and Henry Milburn were charged with having assaulted and
robbed Robert Rogers on Monday evening near Scotswood Rd. He was
attacked by Wanless and knocked down, while Milburn rifled his pockets.
Both prisoners ran away. He described them to the police, and they were
apprehended, when a handkerchief tobacco box was found on Wanless which
was identified as belonging to the prosecutor. However, the prosecutor
refused to be sworn, saying he was drunk at the time and knew nothing
of the transaction, while the police say he was not drunk. The bench
threatened to commit him for perjury, as they believed he had been
tampered with. The prisoners were remanded for further investigation.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, October 26, 1855

Adam Wanless was charged with having stolen a coat from Charles
Brewster. The prisoner had been drinking at the Collingwood Inn,
Pudding Chare, when he picked up the coat and walked off with it.
Police found it concealed in his house in Railway Street. He was
committed for trial.

The Aberdeen Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Wednesday, February 27, 1856

Pittenwerm, Feb 15 – the Friendship, capt. Wanless, from the Tyne to
Aberdeen with iron plates, was abandoned in a sinking state on the 13th
Feb off the Fern Islands; crew saved.

The Aberdeen Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Wednesday, March 5, 1856

Arrived in Aberdeen, the Lydia, capt. Wanless, Sunderland. [Sailed again from Aberdeen on 9 March, for Newcastle.]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, April 11, 1856

West Valley Stallion Show at Wolsingham, Co. Durham – best
thorough-bred stallion, prize of £5 went to Sheffield, owned by Mr.
Wanless, Chester-le-Street.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, May 2, 1856

Jane Moor and Robert Wanless were charged with having created a
disturbance in Denton-chare on Thursday night. After evidence was
heard, Moor was discharged and Wanless was fined 2s 6d.

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Friday, May 16, 1856

Sound List – the Edith, capt. Wanless, at Elsinore from Montrose for
Copenhagen. [22 May paper reported the Edith arrived at Copenhagen on
the 17th. from Montrose.]

The Era (London, England), Sunday, June 1, 1856

A court-martial was opened yesterday on board the Victory, flag-ship,
with the proceedings lasting until past six in the evening, to try Mr.
John Wanless, assistant-engineer of the second-class, serving on board
the Beacon, screw gun-boat, Lieut. Commanding E.A.T. Stubbs, on charges
of being absent from his vessel without leave, behaving in a
contemptuous manner towards his commanding officer, and disobeying
orders. By the evidence it appeared that the prisoner was absent
without leave and on returning and being charged with the offense by
his commanding officer, he replied in a very insulting and contemptuous
manner. Captain Codrington demanded an explanation which the prisoner
refused to give. The court found him guilty and sentenced him to 6
months in her Majesty’s gaol at Winchester and to be dismissed from her
Majesty’s service.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 8, 1856

To let, front and back shops with extensive cellarage and
appurtenances, late in the occupation of Mr Wanless, Ale and Porter
Merchant, at the Head of Dean street in Newcastle.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, September 12, 1856

Arrived at St Petersburg the 31st ult, the Edith, capt. Wanless, from Inverkeithing

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, September 12, 1856

Sunderland Races – Mr John Wandless’s “Lady Durham”, 4 yrs, took a 1st

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Saturday, October 4, 1856

For sale by auction – the North Biddick estate near Washington, about
500 acres, including Worm Hill and West Farms with homesteads and
offices currently let to Mr Wandless at £225 per annum. [repeated 10
Oct]

The Aberdeen Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Wednesday, October 22, 1856

Sailed from Aberdeen, Oct 14, the Lydia, capt. Wanlass, Sunderland

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 12, 1856

On Saturday last, the inhabitants of Netherwitton and neighbourhood met
in the schoolroom of that village and presented Lancelot Wanlass, a
private in the 1st Royal Dragoon, with a neat silver watch bearing a
suitable inscription, and a purse containing nearly £15 raised by
subscription. Wanlass, who had passed through the whole of the Crimean
campaign, wears three clasps and a medal, is on a visit to his mother.
The chair on this occasion was occupied by Joseph Snowball, Esq.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, January 16, 1857

Mrs. Wandless is engaged to superintend the decorating of Victoria
Rooms, Hull, for the forthcoming season. New stock of upholstery,
paint, wallpaper makes this the largest and cheapest decorating
establishment out of London. [repeated Jan 23]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, May 8, 1857

William Wanless took a second-year prize at Church School, Heddon-on-theWall

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Monday, August 10, 1857

Mr J. Wandless has been promoted from Tidewaiter and Acting Inspector of Patrol to be Assistant Tidesurveyor at Sunderland.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, October 2 and 9 and 16, 1857

To be let for 21 years, the Biddick Hall, Woodside, Worm Hill, and
Holly Hill farms, occupied by Mr Robson, Messrs Wanless and others –
465 acres at North Biddick, parish of Washington, co. Durham.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, October 16, 1857

Robert Laydon was charged with having assaulted James Moore with intent
to rob him, on the Scotswood road…the prisoner and a person named
Wanless were stated by the police to be dangerous characters
frequenting that part of town. They never worked any and no doubt lived
by plunder. Prisoner was committed for 2 months.

The Aberdeen Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Wednesday, November 4, 1857

Arrived at Aberdeen, the Nymph, Wanless, Sunderland and the Lydia, Wanless, Sunderland.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, January 8, 1858

Ann Wanless and Margaret Wilson were charge with robbing James Boyd of
£103. He is a trafficker of fruit in this town. On Sunday he went with
friends to dinner at the Crown Inn in Newgate street, with the money in
his pocket. After dinner his friends left him and he lay down in a bed
belonging to the girl Wanless, who occupied 2 rooms in the house, the
other person Wilson acting as a sort of assistant waiter. After he had
lain down about half an hour, Wanless came and lay down beside him,
after which he fell asleep. At about half past three he awoke, finding
Wanless also awake still beside him. He got up, missed his money, gave
the alarm, and the two girls were taken into custody. The house was
searched with no trace of the missing money. Prosecutor requested a
further earch of the house. Defense said there had been no robbery and
it was hard to beleive that the prosecutor had come by £103 when a few
weeks ago he was unable to pay a fine of 26s for an assault on his
wife. The prisoners were remanded and to be set at liberty if a further
search revealed no further evidence. [The Jan 15th paper revealed that
the girls were discharged due to lack of further evidence.]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, May 7, 1858

Sale of livestock and implements from the Worm Hill Farm at North Biddick because Mr Wanless is quitting the farm.

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Wednesday, August 4, 1858

Dunbar Gymnastic Games at Castle Park – Alex. Wanless of Longformacus, quoits, 18 yards, 2nd place

Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Saturday, September 4, 1858

Robert Wanless Kelley a director of the Liverpool New Exchange.

Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Thursday, September 16, 1858

Arrived at Leith, Sep 14, the Columbus, capt. Wanless, from Matanzas, with molasses

Illustrated London News (ancestry.com)

18 Dec 1858 – Metropolitan News

St. Saviour’s Grammar School, Southwark

The anniversary of the foundation of this school by Queen Elizabeth, AD
1568, was commemorated Wednesday…The boys presented Rev. Mr. Povah,
headmaster, with a handsome silver salver on which was engraved a
suitable inscription…Mr. J.M. Wanless, on behalf of the old students,
accompanying the presentation with an appropriate expression of esteem
for their late master.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 30, 1859

Mr. Wanless of Chester-le-Street gave £3 subscription to form a Rifle Corps for the C-l-S neighbourhood.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, March 2, 1860

Arrived Jan 30 at Matanzas, the Columbus, capt. Wanless, from Hull

The Times, Wednesday, Apr 11, 1860; pg. 11

Court of the Queen’s Bench – Court Papers for Easter Term – Special Papers – Wanless v. Jackson, County Court appeal

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, June 1, 1860

At Hartlepool, a gale on May 28 wrecked many ships. The brig Lalla,
capt. Wanless, of Sunderland, from Dunkirk; crew saved by the rocket
apparatus.

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Thursday, October 18, 1860

Cleared Quebec on 3 Oct, the Columbus, Wanless, for Leith.

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Friday, October 26, 1860

Ad: At Leith, for Demerara – the fine brig Columbus, 335 tons register,
Neil Wanless, commander, shortly expected here and will meet with
immediate despatch. For freight & c apply to James Duncan & Co.
Leith, 23 Oct 1860

The Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh, Scotland), Friday, November 9, 1860

Arrived at Leith Nov 8 the Columbus, Wanless, from Quebec with timber

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 15, 1861
North
Shields – the Rival, capt. Smith of Blyth, arrived here from Antwerp,
has been put under custom’s detention because Mr. Wanles, tide
surveyor, when boarding the ship, having detected 15 lbs of contraband
tobacco in a bag belonging to one of the crew.

The Aberdeen Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Wednesday, September 11, 1861

Arrived at Aberdeen 8 Aug the Helena, capt. Wanless, Sunderland.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 6, 1861

Pelton Fell – on Thursday last at Chester-le-Street, Robert Wanless
[and others named] were charged with disturbing the peace. They had
burned in effigy a blacksmith named Thomas Robson and had fired guns.
Several stones were thrown at Robson’s door and the burning effigy
placed in his garden. Prisoners were bound over to keep the peace for 6
months and pay £20 each plus sureties of £10 each plus costs.

[The January 1862 papers were full of the Hartley Colliery calamity, which is covered elsewhere on this site.]

The Morning Chronicle (London, England), Wednesday, January 29, 1862

List of men seeking employment elsewhere after Hartley Colliery closed included Thomas Wanless, Luke Wanless, Peter Wanless.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, July 11, 1862

Licensed Victuallers Association – Mr Robert Wanless of High street was proposed as a member.

The Times, Thursday, Oct 09, 1862

Unfurnished residence wanted about 30 miles from London with 10 to 12
bedrooms, usual reception rooms, lodge entrance, good out-buildings,
and 50 to 100 acres of grass land; South-Eastern, Great or
North-Western Railways preferred. Address Mrs. Wanless, 6 Chandos
street, Cavendish Square, W.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 20, 1863

North Shields – the tide surveyor, Mr Wanless, who rummaged the Marie,
arrrived at Shields from Dantzig, found 1-1/2 lb of contraband tobacco
on board.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, May 1, 1863

Poaching – at the Moot Hall Police Court, Newcastle, Saturday, Thomas
Wanless, James Joel, and John Flaxman, pitmen of Seghill, were charged
with trespassing in search of game on land belonging to Sir Matthew
White Ridley, Bart., M.P. at Stannington on Apr 3. A keeper saw a dog
chasing a hare on Good Friday and heard shots fired near a plantation
near the locality in question and overtook the 3 men charged. Wanless
was fined £3, Joel 40s, and Flaxman got 2 months imprisonment for not
appearing.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Monday, September 21, 1863

Narrow Escape of a Boat Crew – About half past nine o’clock on
Wednesday night, Mr Wandless, tide surveyor, with his boat’s crew
consisting of six outdoor officers, left the Customs station at Low
Lights, North Shields, to board the Prussian brig Amicitia, Captain
Heyn, which was proceeding up the harbour from Shields in tow of two
steamers. When opposite No 3 tier, the Customs boat came up to the
vessel and on going alongside, one of the steamers ceased towing so far
that the towline fell astern of the boat. The steamer then resumed
towing and the towline tightened and caught the keel of the Customs
boat and upset it. Mr. Wandless and his crew were thrown into the
water. Five of the outdoor officers were rescued quickly by foy boatmen
Henry and Thomas Appleby who were close at hand in their boat. Mr.
Wandless the tide surveyor and Mr R. Wisencraft, outdoor officer,
succeeded in seizing the towline of one of the steamers and held on
until they were rescued by the mate and two of the crew of the Prussian
brig. A foy boatman named William Nicholson also rendered assistance in
getting the two men into the boats.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 19, 1864

North Shields – Mr Wanless Trole, tide surveyor, found some contraband on board. [Trole? Huh?]

Birmingham Daily Post (Birmingham, England), Monday, May 2, 1864

The Strike at Seghill Colliery – Commencement of the Evictions – The
pitmen’s strike at Seghill Colliery, which has now lasted seven weeks,
entered a new phase – evicting the striking pitmen from the colliery
houses…..The police proceeded to another house further up Flat Top
Row. This house was occupied by Joseph Wanless, his wife, mother, and
nine children.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 12, 1864

Harbottle Annual Soiree – Mrs Wanlass, of Park House, helped provide the tea.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, January 27, 1865

Newcastle School of Art – J.W. Wanless competed in shaded drawing from
casts and took honourable mention in outline drawing of the Farnese
Hercules or Laocoon from copy.

Manchester Times (Manchester, England), Saturday, May 27, 1865

Wanless’s Commercial Inn in Leadgate, Co. Durham.

Hampshire Telegraph and Sussex Chronicle etc (Portsmouth, England), Saturday, September 9, 1865

Naval and Military News – The crew of the HMS Liffey, on leave in
Montreal, were entertained in Toronto by a supper at Mr Bolman’s
British Hotel. Wm Wandless, 2nd master of the Liffey, was included.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, September 29, 1865

Selby Magistrates Meeting – George Eccles, gentleman, of Selby, was
summoned for assaulting Mr Francis Wanlass, of Brayton, on the 1st Sept
– fited 40s and costs 18s. Mr Eccles was brought up by the same
complainant and charged with trespassing on Mr Brooke’s land at Brayton
in pursuit of game and was fined 40s and costs 13s 6d.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Tuesday, October 17, 1865

Thomas Wandless, hewer, of West Cramlington, accused of throwing stones
and other missiles at the bailiffs and police in connection with the
strike at West Cramlington colliery.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, October 20, 1865

Testimony re the Cramlington Colliery strike, for which Thomas Wanless,
hewer, was tried [with others] for assaulting Matthew Taylor, police
sergeant

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 22, 1865

At auction – a farm at Hedworth in Jarrow, Durham, about 100 acres, occupied by the representatives of Mr John Wanless

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 23, 1866

The Tyne, capt. Wanless, from Shields for Nantes, has put into
Ramsgate, having been in collision with a barque. The master and crew
jumped on board the barque and the Tyne was boarded at anchor about one
mile and a half off the barque the next morning and brought into
Ramsgate harbour by boatmen. She had received damage to bulwarks,
covering board, and lost topgallant mast.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 24, 1866

Lanchester Petty Sessions, Thursday – Alexander Hood, a young publican
of Whitelehead, was charged with perjury in a trial at Shotley Bridge
County Court on the 25th ult, in an action brought by Mr Wanless, a
brewer of Burnopfield.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, Aug 31, 1866

Hedworth, Brockley Whins – auction by the executors of the late Mr
Wandlass of the away-going crop on the village farm, consisting of
wheat and oats.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 14, 1866

For sale, 5 short-horn steer stirks – Mark Wanlace, Eland Green, Ponteland

The Era (London, England), Sunday, December 16, 1866

Freemasonry – George Wanless, Phoenix Lodge, Sunderland

Perry’s Bankrupt Monthly Gazette; Containing a Complete Register of
English, Scotch, and Irish Bankrupts, Assignees, Dividends, Truts,
Composition, & Inspectorship Deeds, Assignments, Dissolution of
Partnerships, &…. 5 June 1866 [Gale Group, Making of the Modern
World]

Assignments – Wanless, George – May 7 – travelling draper, Bishopwearmouth. Comp. 17.6s5 of 5s in 4 months, secured.

The Times, Wednesday, Feb 13, 1867; pg. 11

Court of the Exchequer – Guildhall – London Special Juries – Moffatt v. Wanless

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 8, 1867

Durham Spring Assizes – Alexander Turnbull was charged with perjury in
an action at Shotley Bridge County Court on 25 July last in an action
brought by Mrs Wanless, brewer, to recover £10 16s, which the prisoner
said he had paid to Mr Wood, traveller for Mrs Wanless. Mr Wood said
the prisoner handed over the money, took the receipt, then seized the
money back again and kept both. Several witnesses in the tap-room
observed the same, and the prisoner was declared guilty and sentenced
to 12 months imprisonment.

The Times, Tuesday, May 21, 1867; pg. 13
Exchequer Champer, May
20 – Tebley v. Wanless – This was an appeal from the judgement of the
Court of the Exchequer in an action for good sold, where a deed of
composition was pleaded. A verdict was entered for the defendant, with
leave to move on. An application was made to the Court of the Exchequer
to enter the verdict for the plaintiff, which was refused. Then there
was this appeal to this court. Mr Kempley argued for the appellant and
Mr Manisty and Mr Lewers appeared for the respondents but were not
heard. The Court affirmed the judgment of the Court below.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, November 1, 1867

On Friday night an explosion took place at Houghall Colliery, about 2
miles from the city of Durham, where two of the workmen nearly lost
their lives. Christopher Wanless and William Cowell, both of Shincliffe
Bank Top, went down the pump shaft between 7 and 8 o’clock to repair
the buckets, but when they got to the bottom of the shaft, an explosion
occurred, the gas having been ignited by the naked light they carried
with them….Wanless was very much burnt about the body and was
severely injured, Cowell was not so much hurt but he was much burnt
about the face, neck, and hands.

The Bristol Mercury (Bristol, England), Saturday, February 8, 1868
A
case “Titley vs. Wanless, Law Reports 2, Exchequer 275″ was mentioned
in a bankruptcy case, but no particulars given. [This is probably the
case referred to as Tebley v. Wanless above.]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, June 5, 1868

Newcastle Wrestling and Great Northern Games – Wrestling, First Round – Fell – G. Wandless, Haltwhistle

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, October 23, 1868

Inquest on the body of William Graham, 47, a foreman labourer at the
shipbuilding yard. On Monday night he went to visit Mr Wanless, grocer,
Wallsend on a business matter. Mr Wanless gave him some whisky and left
the room to attend his shop, and upon returning, discovered Graham had
drunk a great deal. Wanless thought Graham was just drunk, but upon
checking him later, he was found to be dead. The jury returned “died
from apoplexy”.

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Wednesday, October 28, 1868

A new Wesleyan chapel under construction at Bill Quay, Swinburned
Terrace, Newcastle was blown down by a strong gale of wind, falling
upon adjoining houses, killing 4 and injuring 4. A Mr Wandless,
occupying the lower part of the adjoining house to Joseph Brown’s, was
on the spot at once and was immediately joined by others of the
villagers and after an arduous labour of nearly three hours, the bodies
and injured were recovered.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 5, 1869
Durham
Spring Assizes – Wanless vs. the North Eastern Railway Company – in an
action brought by Matthew Bell, publican and carter, Hylton, for
compensation for injuries suffered by his step-son Robert William
Wanless through the negligence of the company’s servants. On 27th
April, 4 boys, including Wanless, were on their way from Hylton to
Grindon. It was necessary to cross a level crossing on the railway.
When the boys got up to this place about 7 o’clock in the evening, the
carriage gate on the Hylton side was open, and after waiting till a
train on the up line had passed, they proceeded to cross. Wanless and a
boy named Jefferson was in advance with the other 2 boys about a yard
or two behind them. The train on the down line came along unobserved by
the boys and the two former were struck by the framework of the engine
and knocked down. Jefferson was killed and Wanless severely injured.
The jury returned a verdict for the plaintiff of £100 and recommended
that swing gates should be substituted for the present ones.

The Times, Saturday, Mar 06, 1869; pg. 4
Wanless vs. the North
Eastern Railway Company – [in addition to the story in the Courant
above, this edition adds the following details] – Wanless suffered a
severe fracture of the right elbow, his side was severely injured,
several teeth were knocked out, and his memory was greatly impaired, so
that he could recall the accident only at intervals.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, May 21, 1869

Newcastle Wrestling and Great Northern Games – Wrestling, First Round – Fell – G. Wandless, Haltwhistle

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Wednesday, June 9, 1869

Primitive Methodist Conference – Anthony Wandless appointed to Leeds 2nd district at the Grimsby Conference

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Friday, October 29, 1869

Yesterday the adjourned inquest on the bodies of Robert Greaves,
fireman, and William Moore, engine driver, the unfortunate men who lost
their lives by the collision between Hunwick and Willington on Friday
night last, was held at the house of Mr G.L. Watson, the Railway Hotel,
Hunwick Station, before Thomas Dean, deputy Coroner. It appeared that
they had taken a train of empties and were making up another load to
take to Tyne Dock. The van and five trucks of coal and coke had been
left in the independent siding and the engine went into the colliery to
bring twelve other trucks to make up the trail…The fireman, John
Wanless, was sent to the point at the main line, and the pointsman at
the siding points. Wanless had only been in the employ a few weeks and
had never been to Brancepeth Colliery. He knew that the van and 5
trucks were on the independent and that the 12 trucks were to join
them, but when he saw the train taken so far beyond the switches on the
main line, he felt sure he was mistaken and the trucks and van were on
the main line, and did not open the switch. It was very dark and being
strange to the place he became confused and timid and let them go on
the down line. The other pointsman called out and Wanlass ran after the
runaway truck to try to put on its brakes, but they gathered speed and
he was unable to do so. The guard got on the gine and also pursued but
was unable to overtake the runaway train in time. This line is a
considerable “dip” and several times trucks and wagons have got away
and ran as far as Willington and Hunwick. After some consultation the
jury returned a verdict of “accidental death” and condemned the
practice of shunting on the main line at the top of an incline and also
the gross carelessness of allowing a man who was a stranger to the
place to have charge of the switches.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Saturday, October 30, 1869

More details on the train crash – apparently the runaway cars passed
Willington station at 40 mph and rammed head-on into a passenger train
which was just leaving Hunwick station. Two men were killed and over 20
injured.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 17, 1869

Robert Wanless and John Wanless both of Blackpool placed in the
hedge-cutting competition at Linden estate, 8 miles north of Morpeth on
the Wooler turnpike road.

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Friday, January 28, 1870

Boy (smart) wanted for draper’s shop – apply to James Wanless, 135 Main st, Anderston

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 4, 1870

M. Wandless of Eland Green, Ponteland, was a judge in the Stannington Ploughing Match.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Friday, April 1, 1870; Issue 78

Durham County Court case regarding John Allen, a fruiterer at
Willington, against Mr Robingson Ferens of Willington, in which Allen
claims to have supplied good for the last election and not been paid £4
5s for them. John Wanless, a clerk at the colliery, was supposed to
handle the business. Wanless disappeared from Willington as soon as the
petition against the election was presented. We have made inquiries but
cannot learn anything about him. Wanless wrote orders for the grocer to
supply the men with food, but no arrangement was made to pay. Ferens, a
coal owner and resident at Willington Hall, said he did not give
Wanless authorization for any tickets or orders for food. I had
discharged him 2 months previously for drunkenness and I did not want
him around. Many witnesses supported these statements. Jury found for
the defendant.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Tuesday, April 19, 1870

Primitive Methodist Bazaar, Darlington – T. Wandless gave an address at the Rise Carr chapel.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Tuesday, May 10, 1870

Primitive Methodists – Sunderland District Meeting – Travelling preachers assigned: Durham – John Taylor and Anthony Wandless

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Tuesday, May 11, 1870

Primitive Methodists – Sunderland District Meeting – Travelling
preachers assigned: Carlisle – Anthony Wandless and William Saul. T.
Wandless of Darlington to be a lay delegate to the conference at
Nottingham in June.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, June 24, 1870

Hexham Royal Grammar School – L. Wanlace took a prize

Birmingham Daily Post (Birmingham, England), Tuesday, August 2, 1870

West Bromwich – George Parker of Birmingham charged with assaulting
George Wanless, station-master at Handsworth railway station, on the
15th inst, intoxicated at the time. Fined 10s and costs. The Bench
thought it their duty to protect a person holding such a responsible
situation as that of station-master.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), June 12, 1871

Primitive Methodist Conference – Anthony Wandless has served his 4 year
probationary period and been examined and is an approved preacher

The Times, Saturday, Jul 22, 1871

Arrived from Gibraltar 11 July, British merchant steamer Marbella, Capt. W. Wanless, from Swansea

[The Sept 1871 papers were full of the murder/suicide in the railway
carriage of Mr & Mrs Wanless of Pemberton, Lancs. – these articles
are filed elsewhere at Wanless Web.]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 15, 1871

Wanted, a lad or man as farm servant, apply to Mark Wanlace, Dam Dykes, Cramlington

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, January 19, 1872

Robert Wanlass of Blackpool took 3rd in the hedge-cutting portion of
ploughing match at Linden and William Wanlass of Blackpool took 2nd.

The Derby Mercury (Derby, England), Wednesday, July 10, 1872

In Vice-Chancellor Malins’ court on Friday, a romantic case was
settled. The late Nathaniel Bates of Melbourne Hall, Northumberland,
who had an income of £19,000 per year, by his will dated Dec 1868
bequeathed £1000 to “the person I might have wished to marry”, but if
she does not survive the testator, then the £1000 was to be divided
between the 3 eldest girls under 10, children of the 3 agricultural
hinds residing nearest to Melbourne Hall. A petition was presented by
George Wilson and Ellen his wife, formerly Ellen Wandless, on the
grounds that Ellen answered the description of the person the testator
might have wished to marry. She had been his cook for nearly 3 years
and during that time the testator had on several occasions made her
offers of marriage, which she had always declined. With the consent of
the testator’s surviving sister, who was his residuary legatee,
one-half of the money will be paid to Ellen Wilson and the remaining
half divided among the 3 daughters of 3 hinds.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 9, 1872

On Monday, before the Darlington magistrates, a number of pitmen were
charged with assaulting the police at Heighington. The men lived in the
neighbourhood of Old Shildon and had attended a gathering at
Heighington, where they got drunk and began to fight around midnight.
The police intervened and were attacked for their trouble and were
badly beaten. Ten men were committed for 2 months hard labor, including
George Wanless, Wm. Wanless, John Jaques, Thomas Jaques, and others
[named].

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Friday, November 22, 1872

Greyhound coursing at Quarry Bank near Morpeth – Mr T Wandless’s “Albert Victor” lost to Mr J. Harrison’s “Hollunda”

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 20, 1872

Ad – Wanless & Company, Wine & Brandy Importers, 119 Northumberland street, Newcastle

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 27, 1872

A pitman named Samuel Potts, residing at the Brickyards near Sherburn
Station, died on Christmas Eve under circumstances of a singular
character. He had been drinking on Saturday afternoon in the Wheat
Sheaf public house in Claypath, Durham, with a weaver named Joseph
Wanless and about 8 o’clock he went with Wanless to his house in
Gilesgate. Mrs. Wanless was out, and according to her husband’s
statement, they lay down on the bed and fell asleep. Mrs Wanless came
home about a quarter to 10 o’clock and found her husband asleep in the
bed. The window was open and some articles on the table had been
shifted aside to allow person to go onto it. She heard groans from
below and on going down stairs, she found the deceeased lying
apparently in great pain. He was taken into the house and a surgeon was
sent for, who said deceased stated he had been seized with cramp and
had gone to the back door, but he denied going out the window, which
was 20 feet from the ground. He was taken home Monday but gradually
sank and died. His body bore no trace of injury.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, January 17, 1873

For sale – freehold and leasehold properties in Wallsend, by the
executors of the late Joseph Harbit Esq. including Nos. 28, 30, and 32
High Street West, consisting of a butcher’s shop, dwelling house,
killing shop, and 3 tenements, currently occupied by Messrs Harbet, G.
Wanless, & c.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Tuesday, February 11, 1873

Mr John Wanlass, 173, Auckland terrace, Old Shildon – listed as the
contact for the Shildon Co-operative Butcher’s Society in a hiring ad

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Saturday, May 31, 1873

Mr Wanless of Egglescliffe was one of the 3 most likely of 62
candidates for Board schoolmaster of Norton school board, but Mr Young
was chosen, at a salary of £150 per annum.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Thursday, June 12, 1873

Mr Thomas Wandless elected to be circuit secretary of the Primitive Methodist Circuit at Darlington.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Friday, July 18, 1873

Ad – slaters wanted – apply to Mr Thomas Wandless. [repeated several times in July and Sept]

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Monday, August 25, 1873

The Northern Industrial Show at Shildon – Mr. Wanless of South Durham
Colliery was appointed a judge in the Mechanical Department

The Times, Tuesday, Sep 23, 1873;

British merchant steamers arrived from Gibraltar – 12 Sept – the Charlton, Capt. N. Wanless from Newcastle for Galatz

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Friday, June 26, 1874
At the
Durham Borough Police Court yesterday, James Wandless, shoemaker,
Gilesgate, Durham, was charged with having assaulted John Murray, rag
merchant, Claypath. Mr Folkard appeared for the complainant; Mr H.J.
Marshall was for the defendant. All the witnesses were ordered out of
the Court. Mr Folkard briefly stated the circumstances of the cases,
which, he said, arose out of the recent election for the City of
Durham. The complainant was a Conservative and took an active part on
behalf of his party in the last election. The Recorder said politics
could not be introduced as part of the case. In the trial, John Murray
said he was a rag dealer living with his mother in Claypath. On 11
June, election day, he saw Wm Goundry pass a coin to Mrs McDonald (her
husband is a voter). Wandless knocked Murray down for looking in the
window. Mr Goundry said Mr Murray struck Wandless first. Several people
swore that no money had changed hands and Murray had struck first.
Murray was then charged with having assaulted Wandless, which was
proved, and Murray was fined 10s and costs. [In a July 7 version of
this story, it is Joseph Wanless several times. Later in the same
article, he is referred to as John Wanless, shoemaker!]

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Thursday, July 2, 1874

Dundee Police Court, Tuesday – William Wanless, cowfeeder, Perth
Road, was charged with depositing a diseased cow in a yard or court in
Robinson’s Lane, Perth Road, without having obtained a license from the
Police Commissioners. He pleaded guilty but said he was not aware of
any such clause in th ePolice Ace. The Magistrate believed him and
imposed the lightest penalty the law allowed, namely £2 10s fine or 20
days in prison. As he left the Court, Wanless stated that he thought it
was rather hard for a man to lose his cow and pay 50s for burying it.
(Laughter.)

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, July 3, 1874

Durham Quarter Sessions – John Wandless, 23, cabinetmaker, indicted for
stealing planes and various other joiners’ tools, the property of
Robert Young and another at Bishopwearmouth on the 5th May. Found
guilty and sentenced to 6 months imprisonment.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, July 31, 1874

Police Court,Hull, on Tuesday – George Wandless, apparently a labourer,
was charged with being drunk and disorderly on the previous day. It
appeared that he had obtained the money with which to go to Australia,
and had spent it. He has been several times convicted previously, and
the Mayor having told him that he was a “worthless fellow”, fined him
40s and costs.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Monday, November 9, 1874

Stockton Police Court – two slaters, James Layler and James Walton, in
the employ of Mr Thomas Wandless, slate merchant, Darlington, were
charged with obtaining money by false pretences. They were working on
the Wesleyan Chapel at Saltburn-by-the-Sea and lied about how many
hours they had worked. Mr Wandless gave evidence to prove that the
amount of time had not been worked. They were committed to trial at
Durham Qtr Sessions.

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), Tuesday, December 1, 1874

Shipping News – Entered Outwards from Swansea Nov 30, the Auld Reckie
[or Reekie?], B [brig], 192, [captain] Wandless, to Lisbon, Simpson
Bros.

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), Thursday, December 3, 1874

Entered outwards Dec 2 from Swansea, the Crown, B, 391, Wandless, Garrucha, Simpso Bros

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Friday, December 4, 1874

To let, house & butcher’s shop at Eldon Lane – apply to George Wanless, South Durham Colliery

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Saturday, June 5, 1875

Explosion in Sidegate Colliery, Durham – About 2 o’clock Thursday
morning, as some sinkers were engaged at a new sinking in Sidegate
Colliery, Durham, one of them let off a “blower” i.e. an accumulation
of gas in a hollow spot, and, striking the naked lights the men were
working by, it at once exploded. Three men were hurt, one so slightly
he walked away at once. The other two, Henry Crowther and Joseph
Wandless, were taken by a policeman to the County Hospital, where it
was found that Wandless had sustained burns on his left arm and the
other man similar injuries on his hand. Their wounds were dressed and
both men were able to proceed to their homes.

The Aberdeen Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Wednesday, September 22, 1875

Shipping – Arrived at Aberdeen Sep 15, the Crown, Wandless, Lisbon, salt.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Wednesday, December 29, 1875

Sailed from Stockton Dec 28, the Miss Wandless, Capt. Ellis, for Middlesbrough, light

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Tuesday, February 22, 1876

Arrived at Stockton Feb 21, the Miss Wandless, Capt. Ellis, from Carnarvon, slates

Perry’s Bankrupt Monthly Gazette, 23 May 1876

Liquidation – William John Wandless, grocer & c, Seaham Harbour

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, May 12, 1876

Bishop Auckland court – Wanless’s public house in Bitchburn

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Thursday, July 1 (all week) 1876

For sale – a house in Garden street, Darlington, containing 7 rooms.
Apply to T. Wandless, slate merchant, Garden street, Darlington.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Thursday, July 6, 1876

Charge of Cutting and Wounding at Pontefract – Yesterday at the West
Riding Court house, Pontefract, Mary Sheriden, the wife of a miner
living at Nostell near Wakefield was committed to trial at the next
session, charged with cutting and wounding Catherine Wanless, the wife
of another miner with whom she had been lodging.

Daily News (London, England), Saturday, July 8, 1876

Partnership dissolved – T. Goodliffe and T. Wanless, Byker, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, builders

Daily News (London, England), Friday, July 21, 1876

Moralistic tale about Master Thomas Wanless, age about 14, in the third
form at Richmond Grammar School, whose stepmother bought him a
“crib” to help with his Latin translations and helped him too much.
Young Wanless was caned, which made him ill and humiliated. [followed
by a discourse on corporal punishment]

Daily News (London, England), Friday, July 21, 1876

Richmond Nisi Prius Court, Tuesday – Wanless vs. Snowden – Mr. Wanless
charged school headmaster Rev. James Snowden with assault on his son
Thomas, who had been lashed 20 strokes with canes on his back and
raised distinctively swollen marks. The law says a master can inflict
corporal punishment on a student. The jury found for the defense. [This
version says the student was assisted by his sister rather than his
stepmother. A July 22 Leeds Mercury version says Mr Wanless had lived
for many years in Richmond and had retired from business.]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, July 21, 1876

Felton Agricultural Society annual show – Mr. N. Moore Wanlass of
Blackpool, Longhorsley took a 1st for a guinea fowl cock and hen

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 18, 1876

Gateshead – Thomas Wanless, landlord of the Seven Stars public house,
Swalwell, was charged with permitting drunkenness on his licensed
premises. Case was dismissed for lack of evidence.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Friday, September 15, 1876

Opening of St George’s Presbyterian Church, Stockton – Mr J Wandless of Darlington did the slater’s work on the project

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, September 15, 1876

George Wandlass, an elderly man, charged with being drunk & disorderly on Cogan street, fined 20s and costs

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 23, 1877
Durham
Quarter Sessions – John Walton Wanless (25), cabinet-maker, pleaded
guilty to stealing one black cloth coat and other articles, the
property of Wm Jamison, at Whitworth on the 16th April 1876, and was
sentenced to 9 months imprisonment. [Feb 6th Northern Echo says the
crime occurred at Spennymoor and was committed to trial at Bishop
Auckland Police Court.]

Birmingham Daily Post (Birmingham, England), Friday, March 2, 1877

New Patents – James Means, William Wandless, and Thomas Charlton,
Jarrow, Durham, improvements in the means or appatus for making
horse-shoes, dated Oct 16, 1876

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Thursday, March 15, 1877

Mr Thomas Wandless was recommended to be nominated for the Primitive Methodist conference, Darlington Circuit.

Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin, Ireland), Tuesday, March 20, 1877

Sailed for Dublin from London, the Miss Wandless, Liverpool.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Friday, May 18, 1877

New church at Great Stainton or Stainton-le-Street opened; Mr Wandless of Darlington provided the slater’s work.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, Aug 10, 1877

Hull Police Court – Peter Wandlass, a young man, was charged with
stealing a quantity of canvas, value £2 20s, from Messrs Bailey and
Leetham. Prisoner was suspected of taking the canvans from the s.s.
Lorne some time this morning and on being charged, said he had left it
at his lodgings in High street. He pled guilty and was sentenced to 4
months imprisonment.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 21, 1877

Miss Wanlace presided over a stall at a bazaar in Morpeth to raise funds for the Congregational Church of Morpeth.

Aberdeen Weekly Journal (Aberdeen, Scotland), Thursday, February 7, 1878

Sailed from Aberdeen Feb 6, the Miss Wandless, [captain] Ellis, to Thurso, in ballast.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 22, 1878

Sunderland Court – Ann O’Neil was sent to prison for 2 months for stealing 2 rabbits, property of Mr Wandless, High Street

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 1, 1878

Mr Wanless is selling his stock & c. at Bolton Mill in the parish of Edlingham on May 7.

The Times, Monday, Apr 08, 1878; pg. 11

Vice-Chancellor’s Court, Lincoln’s Inn – Causes for Trial – Johnson v. Wanless (with witnesses)

[9 April paper reported that this case was part heard]

The Times, Thursday, Apr 25, 1878; pg. 11
The Committee of
Lloyd’s would be glad of any information regarding the following
vessels which have not been heard from for some time and are feared
lost with all hands: The new iron ship Snowdonia which sailed from
Sunderland on 5 Oct last for Bombay, on her first voyage, laden with
coals, commanded by Captain Roberts. It is feared she went down in the
English channel as a quantity of wreckage was picked up in October in
the neighbourhood of Swanage and Portland, including the stern of a
boat with the name Snowdonia on it. The crew numbered 25
hands…[listed, including] John Wanless, able seaman.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, May 31, 1878

Outbreak of pleuro-pneumonia in cattle in the lower Wansbeck valley, at
Mr. R Wanless, Bolam Dene, adjoining Mr R. Hall, Low Gallow Hill, where
the disease has been recurrent.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, June 14, 1878

During the recent evictions at Eldon Colliery, Mr. Wanless tried to get through the crowd in a trap and it took him an hour.

Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin, Ireland), Monday, August 12, 1878

Sailed from Drogheda on Saturday, the Miss Wandless, Ellis, master, for Portmadoc with ballast.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Monday, October 21, 1878

Arrived in Goole, Friday, the Miss Wandless, Capt. Ellis, coal, Plymouth

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Tuesday, November 19, 1878

Murder trial of Charles Arlop alias Bailes for the murder of Sarah Ann
France, wife of Joseph France, a keelman living in Wandless Buildings,
Osborne street, Hull.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Monday, January 27, 1879

For sale – Eldon Brickworks, with manager’s house attached – apply to
Mr George Wanless, Eldon [or others named; this was still for sale in
1882]

Perry’s Bankrupt Monthly Gazette 1879
12 June 1879 – Eldon Brick
& Tile Company (manufacturers) partnership dissolved – George
Wanless & Andrew Farmer. Debts by Wanless.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 7, 1879

To be let – Earsdon Moor Farm in Bothal parish, occupied by Messrs. Wanless, 329 acres

Perry’s Bankrupt Monthly Gazette 1879

12 Feb – Richard Wanless Venus, greengrocer & beer retailer, 52 Edwards st, Bowesfield-la, Stockton

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Monday, February 17, 1879

Boat Race on the Tyne – A match in open boats between Frank Kirton of
Newcastle and Robert Wanless of Howdon for £25 a side was rowed
Saturday morning. The distance rowed was 2 miles from the High Level
Bridge to Armstrong’s Jetty. After a race, the principal feature in
which was bad steering, Kirton won. Betting at the start was evens. [In
the Feb 21 version in the Newcastle Courant, it was Joseph Wanless! In
the 1880s, Jos. Wanless of Howdon and T. Wanless of Howdon are
mentioned in rowing races on the Tyne.]

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Tuesday, April 8, 1879

Sailed from Stockton Apr 7 the Miss Wandless, [Capt.] Ellis, for Middlesbro, light

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Monday, June 9, 1879

Sailed from Stockton June 7 the Miss Wandless, [Capt.] Ellis, for Middlesbro, light

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Monday, June 11, 1879

Sailed from Stockton June 10 the Miss Wandless, [Capt.] Ellis, for Swansea, iron

Perry’s Bankrupt Monthly Gazette, 14 Jun 1879

Stephenson & Wandless, joiners and builders, Barnard Castle (Mark Anthony Stepheson and James Wandless)

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 22, 1879

Local Records and Notes – A curious escape from lightning occurred on
May 3, 1777 at the house of Hannah Wanless, Chester-le-Street, whre all
the inmates were knocked about without injury and a cat sitting by the
fire was torn into four pieces and all the bedding and furniture burnt.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, December 19, 1879

On Sunday morning a very serious fire occurred at the farm of Stoney
Hills about a mile south of Alnwick. About 1 a.m. 2 policemen on duty
in town noticed a glare in the sky. Proceeding at once in the direction
of the light, they found the farm ablaze. The straw barn, the threshing
barn, and the cow byre were all on fire and the roofs had fallen in.
Everybody in the house was asleep. The policemen roused Mr Wanless (the
farmer) and his family, and Miss Smith who lives in a house close by,
and gave the alarm to Mr Sordy at the neighbouring farm of
Greensfield….It is supposed that the fire must have been caused by a
tramp who had contrived to get into the straw barn to sleep. The farm
is on the Swansfield estate, belonging to the Duke of Northumberland.

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), Wednesday, December 24, 1879

Signalled off the Lizard: schooner Miss Wandless of Carnarvon

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, January 23, 1880

In the Customs, Mr. J. Hood has been appointed boatman 2nd class,
Newcastle, and Mr. W.J. Wandless boatman 2nd class, Sunderland.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Monday, March 29, 1880

Thomas Wandless nominated as a Guardian of Darlington, Central Ward (two required).

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), April 8, 1880

Hull Police Court – Plucking a Pigeon – John Beverley, a man of
respectable appearance, charged Mary A. Wandlass and Sarah Casey alias
Kenedy alias McRae with stealing from him a coat, vest, and other
articles of dress. He had accompanied the prisoners to a house in
Trundle street and after he had retired, the prisoners had taken his
clothes away and pledged them. The prisoners declared they had his
authority to pledge the clothes, and asked if it was possible to take
off a man’s shirt without his permission. Case was remanded for 8 days.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), April 23, 1880

Impudent Theft – Mary A. Wandlass and Sarah Casey, the two young women
charged with stealing a man’s clothes while he lay in bed, were again
brought up and further remanded for 7 days.

Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser (Dublin, Ireland), Tuesday, July 27, 1880

Arrived at Newry, yesterday, the Miss Wandless, of Carnarvon, master Ellis, from Swansen, with coals.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, November 5, 1880

Grimbsy Borough Police – Mary Ann Wanless and others were charged with
stealing £5 8s, 2 pipes, and a lead pencil. Sentenced to 3 weeks.

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, December 3, 1880

Arrived in Grimsby, Nov 30, the Miss Wandless, master Ellis, from Caen

The Hull Packet and East Riding Times (Hull, England), Friday, December 17, 1880

Sailed from Grimsby on Dec 14, the Miss Wandless, master Ellis, for Boston

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, April 15, 1881

Farm stock of Mr Mark Wanlace, Damdykes, near Annitsford Station,
Dudley for sale. [list of stock follows on Apr 29 and May 6]

The Times, Thursday, Jun 09, 1881

Mr. Thomas Drummond Wanliss of Victoria elected a Fellow of the Royal Colonial Institute

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Friday, October 14, 1881

Arrived at Middlesbro, Oct 12, the Miss Wandless, master Ellis, from Carnarvon, with slates

Glasgow Herald (Glasgow, Scotland), Wednesday, February 15, 1882

Theft of shawls from the shop of Mr James Wanless in Main Street, Anderston.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Monday, March 20, 1882

At the Masonic funeral in Sunderland of William Henry Crookes was (among many others) C.G. Wanless, P.M., 94.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, April 21, 1882

Tynemouth County Court – George Wanless, grocer, Wallsend, was charged
with having assaulted his wife, Grace, at that place on the 3rd inst.
After hearing the evidence of the complainant and other witnesses,
defendant was sentenced to 2 months imprisonment with hard labour and
to find 2 sureties of £25 each for future good conduct toward his wife
for the next 12 months.

North Wales Chronicle (Bangor, Wales), Saturday, August 12, 1882

Arrived at Port Penrryn, the Miss Wandless, master Ellis.

Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Friday, October 6, 1882

Board of Trade inquiry into the wreck of the barque Arethusa which
sailed for Quebec last Aug 17th. The account of the master was
unintelligible due to drinking. The court was compelled to rely for a
true version of the facts upon the evidence of William Wanless, A.B.,
an intelligent man for his class, who had been 20 years at sea.

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, October 27, 1882
Young
Folks Column – Letter Box – Dear Aunt Maggie, I have read the Young
Folks Column for a long time now and I thought I would write and tell
you how much I like it. We have two dogs named Carlo and Spot, and a
big cat and such a tiny little kitten which I call my baby. It jumps on
my shoulder and pats my face with its little paw and purrs till I take
notice of and stroke it. It does not like Spot at all, it sets his back
up and spits at him and poor Spot is much afraid of it. The old cat and
Spot are very friendly; they eat out of one saucer and sleep together,
but pussy is very naughty and kills mamma’s chickens and pigeons. Carlo
is a nice dog, but he is getting old now; he has lost all his teeth and
is getting deaf and blind. I think this is all about my pets this time.
Signed, Helen Wanless

Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Thursday, August 2, 1883

Wesleyan Methodist Conference at Hull – William Wandless was among
those examined for ordination. On August 4th, the Northern Echo
reported that he had been assigned to Lealholm in the Whitby &
Darlington district.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Thursday, August 23, 1883

Arrived at W. Hartlepool, Aug 22, the Mabel, ss [steamship], [master] Wandless, from Dieppe, in ballast

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Monday, September 3, 1883

Wesleyan Ministerial Changes – Rev. John W. Vickers and William Wandless moved to Danby.

[skipped a bunch of shipping reports]

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, November 23, 1883

To let, in Alnwick, 1 Hotspur Place, containing 4 rooms, yard, & c., occupied by Mr. T. Wanless

The Newcastle Courant etc (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 28, 1884

Alnwick, Stoney Hills Farm – stock and implements belonging to Mr James
Wanless were sold by auction. Mr Wanless being a great favourite in the
neighbourhood, there was a large attendance, all anxious to make the
sale a satisfactory one for the out-going tenant. In the evening, Mr.
Wanless liberally entertained his friends.

The Newcastle Weekly Courant (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, August 15, 1884

Newcastle Bankruptcy Court – George Wanless, grocer, High street,
Wallsend, attributed his failure to bad times and having to meet so
many County Court summonses. He intended to offer compensation of 2s to
the £ in payments over 9 months.

Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post or Plymouth and Cornish Advertiser (Exeter, England), Wednesday, September 10, 1884

At a gathering of philosophers at Montreal (Canada), there was a
running match between Captain Bedford Pim, who had been throughout the
life of the meeting, and Dr. Wanliss of Montreal. Pim won, Wanliss was
2nd. Both were excessively unwell from their exertions.

Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Wednesday, February 18, 1885

The National Coursing Club met at Liverpool. Among other business, a
petition was sent by the North of England Coursing Club asking that the
prohibition by the Nat’l Coursing Club against Wanlace for improper
conduct in 876 might be removed. [Just before this was Sunderland
business, so maybe he was from Sunderland?]

The Pall Mall Gazette (London, England), Friday, March 27, 1885

Mr. T.D. Wanliss in the Empire Club.

Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Saturday, May 30, 1885

St. Helens – Sarah Moss pleaded guilty to stealing an umbrella from the shop of Mrs. Wanless, Westfield street, St. Helens.

The Newcastle Weekly Courant (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, July 24, 1885

Thomas Wanless, Scotswood [and others] summoned for infringing on the
Salmon Fisheries Act…Wanless and Forster were lessees of the
Scotswood fishery and they were charged with shooting their nets too
far across the river…they were fined £2 and costs.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Thursday, April 15, 1886

Early yesterday morning, an engineman named James Wanless found the
body of a young woman, name unknown, floating in the River Tees at the
Newport Ferry Landing. He brought it ashore and it was conveyed to the
Newport Hotel where it awaits identification. The body is a female
about 20, fresh complexion, brown hair, dressed in a black corded
jacket [description follows].

Liverpool Mercury etc (Liverpool, England), Wednesday, May 5, 1886

Loss of a Schooner – a Board of Trade inquiry opened yesterday at St
George’s Hall, touching on the loss of the Welsh schooner the Miss
Wandless of Carnarvon, in the Baltic, off the Scaw, on the 14th of
March last, while on a voyage from Portmadoc to Stettin, with a cargo
of 167 tons of slates. Mr Shand appeared for the captain (Mr. Evan
Ellis), part owner of the schooner, and Mr Paxton conducted the inquiry
on behalf of the Board. The vessel was built of wood in Carnarvonshire
in 1875 and was 92 tons registered. She left Portmadoc on 27 Feb last
with a crew of 5 hands and arrived without accident off the coast of
Denmark. From the 10th to the 13th March, ice was encountered to such
an extent that the navigation of the vessel could not be carried out,
and ultimately she grounded between the Hirtshal an dthe Scaw Lights,
near a life-boat station called Everstead. All hands were saved by
means of the lifeboat from the station, but the vessel became a total
wreck.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Tuesday, August 31, 1886

Middlesbrough – John Wanless for riotous conduct and resisting PC Spark in Stockton street was fined 25s 6d or 21 days.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Thursday, October 21, 1886

At Middlesbrough yesterday, John Wandless, a deserter from the Durham Light Infantry, was remanded to await an escort.

The Newcastle Weekly Courant (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, March 4, 1887

Mrs. Wanlace helped canvass North Gosforth for the Women’s Jubilee Offering, collecting £5 2s 9-1/2d.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Saturday, April 30, 1887

N.W. Wanliss (by proxy) received a M.A. degree at Cambridge.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Tuesday, July 5, 1887

Patent sealed 28 June 1887 to G. Wanless and F. Darling, Eldon, Durham for improvements in pump buckets.

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), Saturday, December 24, 1887

Cardiff – At the examination of candidates for masters and mates
certificates held at Newport this week, Mr. Andrew Wanless of 31 Tudor
road, Riverside, Cardiff, was successful in obtaining his certificate
as 2nd mate. He was prepared by Captain H.C. Mills (Navigation School)
in Cardiff.

The Belfast News-Letter (Belfast, Ireland), Monday, August 2, 1897

New Inventions – Wanliss, Mair, Belfast, for improvements in crank arms and pedals for cycles and the like.

The Newcastle Weekly Courant (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Friday, February 17, 1888

Gateshead County court, Tuesday – John Thomas Stoddart, Wandless
Thompson, and Wm. Armstrong were charged with being found on the
licensed premises of Henry S. Coxon, the Lord Collingwood Inn, Felling,
on the 5th inst. The Bench dismissed the case.

The Leeds Mercury (Leeds, England), Wednesday, August 21, 1889

Re the train wreck that occurred to the Leeds express on Monday night
near Ryhope Station at Sunderland, in which many people were injured
but no one died – Wandless, the driver of the engine, who belongs to
Gateshead, has received an injury to his head. He has been in the
service of the company for many years. It is believed that owing to the
greasy state of the rails where there is a great curve, the engine
slipped and instead of coming round the curve, jumped and ran across
the permanent way. A length of rail was forced through the engine,
which fell on its side on the embankment. The carriages ran on for
about 50 yards, jolting fearfully, until 3 fell over.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Thursday, August 27, 1891

Orchard raids at Barnard Castle – James Wandless, with a feeling of
charity for the accused boy, Arthur Wild, complained to the Barnard
Castle Bench that his orchard had been robbed. Defendant, whom he
caught in the act, was one of 3 lads. Defendant was lectured and fined
2s 6d.

Northern Echo (Darlington, England), Monday, March 28, 1892

Shop-Breaking at Coxhoe – On Friday night or early Saturday morning the
shop of Mr. M. Wandless was broken into and articles of clothing
removed.

The Belfast News-Letter (Belfast, Ireland), Wednesday, August 3, 1892

TheWesleyan Conference at Beadford – William Wandless assigned to Kirby Moorside

The Newcastle Weekly Courant (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England), Saturday, November 24, 1894

Lancelot Wanlace was nominated for District Councillor of Weetslade at a meeting at Seaton Burn.

The Times, Saturday, Dec 16, 1911

Engineer-Lieutenant W. Wanless Reed of the Royal Navy – received an award for service in the Imperial Ottoman Navy

The Times, Thursday, May 06, 1915
Company Meeting of the
Sutherland Steamship Company – report by A. Munro Sutherland – Since
our last annual meeting, our oldest director, Mr. Thomas Wanless, has
died. He took an active interest in the company’s affairs and always
supported any forward movement of the company. T.S. Farish was
appointed to replace him.

The Times, Tuesday, Sep 04, 1923
Estate of Rev. Benjamin
Hemsworth of Monk Fryston hall near Pontefract, YKS – left an annuity
to George Wanless, his estate agent, of £52

The Times, Friday, Aug 07, 1931
The Right Hon. Edmund Milnes
Monckton-Arundell, 7th Viscount Galway, of The Mantles, Bawtry,
Doncaster, chairman of the New Monchton Coke & Chemical Co and of
the New Monckton Collieries, died and left £25 to George Wanless,
formerly groom

The Times, Thursday, Aug 31, 1944

Mr. A.T. Wanless, M.L.C. appointed as a delegate from the South African Labour Party

The Times, Thursday, May 03, 1945

George Lee Wanless, Chairman of the Ashington Coal Company

The Times, Saturday, Nov 24, 1945
Wanless – Reported to have
died while P.O.W. at Sandakan, Borneo, on Jan 27, 1945, S/Ldr Rev. John
Thirlwell Wanless, R.A.F.V.R., beloved husband of Mary Wanless, son of
the late Mr. Thomas and Mrs. Wanless of Craghead, Durham. Will any
P.O.W. who knew him please communicate c/o Barclays Bank, Cirencester,
Glos.

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